Research Group Computational Mechanics (Legato Research Team)

Research by the Legato Team

Legato develops quality-controlled computational modelling tools to support the world in developing intuition on the behaviour of complex systems. Their impact has been far-reaching, including highly cited academic papers, collaborating with over 30 companies, and the creation of two spin-off companies. We also developed open-source software, contributed to policy-making, and trained students.

Innovative solutions through intuitive modeling

Research with high-impact

The Legato Research Team, founded in 2013 by Professor Stéphane P. A. Bordas, is a multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural team that develops quality-controlled computational modelling tools to support the world in developing intuition on the behavior of complex systems. Their impact has been far-reaching, including highly cited academic papers in Engineering, Computer Science, and Cross Field since 2015, helping over 30 companies with innovation road maps, and the creation of two spin-off companies. The team has also developed open-source software, contributed to policy-making, and trained students worldwide. Professor Bordas has been active in disseminating the work of the Legato Team through podcasts and the organization of high-quality international conferences throughout the world.

Some of our projects

  • Start date

    15/10/2018

  • Duration in months

    42

  • Funding

    EU

  • Project Team

    S.Bordas; B.Rato; J.Hale; L.Beex; A.Zilian

  • Abstract

    DRIVEN project was project coordinated by the University of Luxembourg and aiming at boosting the scientific excellence and technology-transfer capacity in data-driven simulation of the University of Luxembourg. Funded by the EUs Horizon 2020 programme for research and innovation, the University of Luxembourg benefited from the collaboration with the 3 top international partners

  • Start date

    01/03/2019

  • Duration in months

    24

  • Funding

    EU

  • Project Team

    J. Lengiewicz (with S. Bordas as a host)

  • Abstract

    The general interest of the project is on a shape-shifting robotic material able to transform into any shape or machine. In the majority of examples, the common superior capabilities of the shape-shifters are their adaptability to external environments or tasks and their tolerance to damage. The foreseeable application domains of shape-shifters seem as futuristic as the technology itself. Try to imagine a future computer game in which you can physically interact with avatars of other online players. In medicine, a shape-shifting material could be injected into the bloodstream, enter the desired areas in organs and treat them. Such adaptable, multi-functional, shape-shifting devices are indeed exciting prospects which could change the way we interact with the world around us. Yet they are still in their infancy, and we remain unable to predict which of the exciting potential applications are actually achievable.
    In this project, the shape-shifters, also known as programmable matter, are viewed as structures composed of interconnected, microscopic, active robotic modules, which are able to process and exchange information, reconnect and move with respect to their neighbours. As such, they compose a computing network of continuously changing connection topology, which must collectively decide how to physically reorganise (similarly to fire-ants, which can form engineering structures from their bodies). One of the obstacles for them to freely reorganise is that, when shape-shifting proceeds, these physical computing collectives may experience a mechanical failure. Just like any other structure, a modular robot may break or turn over if it is not properly balanced. The goal of this project is to appropriately design and programme the collective to achieve both: structurally-safe and efficient transformations of its shape.